Things to Do in Tetouan, Morocco

tetouan morocco marketLocated on the Mediterranean coast of Morocco, Tetouan was historically the main connection between the country and Andalusia, and Spanish influences are evident in town today. About an hour southeast of Tangier in Morocco, Tetouan allows visitors to experience northern Morocco on a smaller, less frantic level than in the major port city. Ferries leave regularly to and from Spain.

Tetouan’s medina is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Though it is smaller than those of larger cities, Tetouan’s medina has been largely untouched, making it an authentic site. Guides can point out the Andalusian, Jewish and Berber sections of the medina, though wandering solo will unearth plenty of interesting experiences. The smaller scale of this medina means fewer opportunities to get dizzyingly lost, making the purchase of rugs and other goods less stressful. (more…)

Day Trips from Rabat

While Rabat, Morocco, has not necessarily established itself as a major tourist destination, this pleasant metropolitan city is a great home base for exploring Morocco’s more modern sites. Morocco’s capital city lacks the hustle and bustle of other Moroccan cities, making it a great place to stay for families traveling with children. Rabat’s medina is rather quiet yet authentic so you take your young ones shopping in the souks without too much worry about losing them in the crowds

There are plenty of sites to see in Rabat like the ancient city of Sale Colonia and Rabat’s most famous landmark, Le Tour Hassan, plus there are many popular historical sites within an easy traveling distance from Rabat. (more…)

Relaxing in Essaouira, Morocco

Blue fishing boats in Essaouira MoroccoIf you travel to Essaouira after visiting other Moroccan cities, one of the first things you might notice in the medina is dreadlocks—several shopkeepers with dreadlocks. The town’s amiable medina, well-kept beach and quiet serenity make Essaouira an attractive place to get away.

Beyond the dreads, the medina, a UNESCO World Heritage site, has a uniquely relaxed ambiance. Rather than calling passers-by into their shops, merchants tend to quietly observe the crowd or mingle with locals, leaving tourists to browse through handmade Berber baskets, colorful fabrics and artisan handicrafts relatively pressure-free. Even negotiating for goods feels low-key, but don’t let down your guard when buying—Moroccan bargaining customs still apply! (more…)